[DEV BLOG] Starting Items in the 2016 Season

**Edit: Okay guys. I'm going to have to stop posting for a while and take care of minor inconveniences like eating or sleeping. Terrible excuses, I know - but apologies. I'll pop by again sometime tomorrow but for tonight, I'm out. Thanks all.** Our original intent with starting items before this season was to give players the ability to reflexively counter their opponents with generalist options running alongside more pronounced counter-items for specific circumstances (Flask, Doran’s Shield). However, after a couple of seasons of attempting to balance this world, we’ve grown unhappy with how confining this approach is and the general problems that resulted from this approach. We’re decided to take a different tactic and adopt a pattern closer to the support line of items: Starter items that clearly express some kind of goal or intent in lane alongside a more generalist item for each of the positions in the game. **Magic** - Doran’s Ring vs. The Dark Seal Doran’s Ring is a powerful farming generalist item while The Dark Seal signifies an intent to roam and pick up champion kills along the the way. While this doesn’t support the full spectrum of mages in mid, it does represent two of the largest factions - push mages vs. assassin roamers. **Attack** - Cull vs. Doran’s Blade Cull is an early skirmish option designed to be focused primarily around farming and light aggression. Doran’s Blade on the other hand, is a generalist option that scales much better into mid-game and is better in skirmish situations. **Jungle** - Hunter’s Talisman vs. Hunter’s Machete Machete has long favored a certain class of attack speed centric characters and this represents a quandary of how to actually support mage or tank style junglers from the get-go. Machete now doubles down on its auto-attack centric nature while Talisman focuses on area burn and mana regeneration. Talisman is primarily designed for spell focused junglers - especially those that have repeated area of effect attacks on moderate cooldowns (like Brand or Zyra). Both of these initial items are required to upgrade into the Tier 2 Jungle item, so your choice of initial item will eventually become moot. However, this flexibility of starting options combined with the patience system should open up stronger opening jungle patterns to a wider variety of junglers. **Lane Sustain** - Health Potion vs. Refillable Potion One of the major issues with Crystalline Flask right now is that we are unable to push its power to the point where it feels non-abusive in lane. This is due to the fact that it stacks with potions and thus any power add-on in Crystalline Flask gets doubled down on because you stack potions with it. Hence, the new inventory rule: you can only ever have one type of potion in your inventory at any time. Refillable Potions are 3 times more expensive than a potion but benefit from the fact that they will recharge once you return to the fountain. Normal Healing Potions represent more healing up-front for less gold but is obviously temporary in nature. **Refillable Upgrades** - Jungle vs. Lane This, by itself, would probably still be on the weak side. However, Refillable Potions can upgrade into two versions: Hunter’s Potion and Corrupting Potion. Hunter’s Potion is a roam-centric potion that can regain charges out in the field while you are killing large jungle monsters. It’s designed primarily to support a Jungle playstyle that focuses on maximal uptime or bolstering characters with low innate sustain. Corrupting Potion is similar to Crystalline Flask on live - with the added benefit of combat power. During its effect, damaging enemy champions will burn them for magic damage over time. Corrupting Potion represents an intent to harass your lane opponent until they give up. **Mana Potions** - Removed Mana Potions have been removed from the game. We’ve generally found that the decision to opt into Mana Potions was one that was either forced upon some champions (aka “I need this mana to function”) or one that was generally only available to a handful of circumstances. The best use cases of Mana Potions were typically to circumvent Mana restrictions for boom/bust play patterns (ie: save up to X amount of mana before dumping it all in a large burst of damage, repeat) vs. attrition-based approaches that are more in favor of straight mana regeneration. A champion being able to access their big “all-in” combo more frequently also makes it challenging for us to balance appropriately, and we’ve seen some more frustrating champions have their power reduced as a result. With the removal of mana potions, we can also retune some champion mana values back to a middle ground. We’ve looked at the data for champions that frequently bought 2 or more mana potions in the game and we’ve either increased their maximum mana or the mana regeneration values based on their class. * **Closing** For the start of the season, we’ve focused on granting at least two options to a particular need in the starting item space to support a wider variety of playstyles and intents from the start of the game.
Share
Report as:
Offensive Spam Harassment Incorrect Board
Cancel