Rioter Comments
JerulEon (NA)
: I just mentioned Riven because it's heavily implied in game VO, and she's listed as a rival for Yasuo - I just inferred that it to be true. Of course, there is always a possibility that something or someone else killed the elder. I would like to point out the part where Taliyah tells him that she is going back to Shurima to protect her family: “Protect,” he said, his voice barely a whisper. “Does your Great Weaver not watch over them?” The words now came through gritted teeth. The man, her teacher, turned toward his lone student, anger flashing in his dark, haunted eyes, the raw emotion startling her. “Your training is unfinished. You risk your life returning to them.” I believe there's another parallel, and Yasuo wants to prevent her from possibly making a brash mistake -- from leaving her current duty of training her powers and possibly causing her own demise. He's angry because he himself left his post where he was assigned before he truly learned his lesson. He feels regret for not letting the other Ionian warriors "protect" at the frontlines, and wants her to stay. Of course the two characters' circumstances are different, but Yasuo's respect for his brother didn't truly lead to Yone's death because Yasuo disrespected him (aka disobeyed his brother's advice). It was Yasuo's mistake for following the advice only halfway and bringing disaster upon himself. (By the way, reading your texts reminds me of my time in American Studies class in high school haha. It's very analytical and well-written.) I feel like your perspective about the root of Yasuo's inner conflict is like the other side of the same coin. Whether he understood the lesson and chose to let his ego take over or he let faith in his brother guide him rather than his own readiness, I think they BOTH can be the reason why he feels guilt. Knowing your take on the matter really complicates Yasuo and makes me like him even more. So deep :)
Yeah, the "Riven As Murderer" thing is a pretty common belief that can only really be suspected. It's something Riot has commented on, which is why I expressly said I would be excluding Riot's general comments on the lore, because clarity brought from outside of the textual lore shouldn't be necessary to the advancement of the plot, because of how hard it can be to collect all the information from those old comments for someone just coming into the scene of lore. (For clarity, their comments have been "Yasuo's lines in game are the beginning of a conversation between the two of them, not an accusation." I'm paraphrasing there, but in no way did I let that inform my own reading. It's just textually supported.) What I see in the part you pointed out, supported by how he gives Taliyah a maple seed _after_ she makes the decision to leave, is that she knows what she wants out of life. That paragraph you've quoted doesn't seem to be referring to the other Ionian warriors, but to the Elder whom he was supposed to protect, and left. If she were to stay with him, she wouldn't be able to protect the lives of those she feels she should. Yasuo is instead concerned with protecting her from herself, and the danger he sees in letting her go, the same way Yone was concerned for Yasuo's growing pride. Only, Taliyah stands up to Yasuo, where Yasuo did not stand up to Yone. Thus, the maple seed, which was supposed to be a lesson of humility to Yasuo, is passed to Taliyah as a reminder of her choice. It could also be taken as the same maple seed Yone gave to Yasuo, as it is old and dry, and they are in the middle of winter when they first meet. If that's the case, it's Yasuo finally letting go of something that reminds him of his failure. Perhaps he no longer needs it as a lesson, because Taliyah, in asserting that he did not know best for her, taught him that the teacher is not always correct. Also, to be clear about my perspective on Yasuo's inner conflict: I believe that the guilt he feels is because he failed his brother by letting his ego take him over, but that the root of his conflict is in not staying true to who he was. His rebellion against being forced into a mold--which yes, was an important lesson to learn, but not one that he embraced--was what caused his troubles, and this rebellion came about because he let Yone have too much of a say in his life without understanding _why._
JerulEon (NA)
: Even if he was posted somewhere else, he still abandoned his post and joined the fight (which is where he would've been regardless). He was framed for the wind-technique that killed the elder. I feel that Yasuo actually knew the meaning of the guard post. He knew the "why" of the position because his brother offered him a maple seed - a symbol of humility, something I think was pretty clear. Yasuo took the post because he trusted his brother, yes, but he never would have unless Yone explained to Yasuo his mistakes. Ultimately, I believe Yasuo chose to ignore the "why" of the position because of his arrogance and ego. Yasuo doesn't blame his lack of understanding and previous state of mind as a given, but he feels regret because he had the ability to choose the right path and chose wrong. Perhaps he could have successfully fought off Riven and protected the Elder but who knows.
Well, we don't _know_ if he would have abandoned another post, as he most likely would have taken an assignment on the front lines, where he would find the glory he sought. And while yes, he was framed for the technique, he also would have been accounted for by the superior he was assigned to, and there would have further been a different guard on the post. We are getting into conjecture here, as there isn't much to back up either side of our argument in Yasuo's original lore, nor any here. From Yone's perspective, in "A Sword Without a Sheath," Yasuo hadn't learned the lesson of the maple seed when he left the Elder alone, which begs the question of why Yasuo took the post if it wasn't because of the lesson. My interpretation offers one reason. It's also important to note when talking about the "why" that it is not something assigned to a path. When Yasuo discusses that philosophy, he is saying that you cannot choose your own path, but you can choose why you follow the path you do. For instance, he chases the murderer because he wishes redemption, not because he's being forced to. So, while he might have known what Yone's reasoning was for the advice given, he doesn't take it into account. I'm not trying to attack your beliefs or how you feel about the champion, just offering an alternative, textually supported interpretation of the events and what they seem to mean with the new information given. (Also, side note: it's unclear whether Riven is or is not the murderer, hence why I have only referred to the murderer as just that. Yasuo seems to have an assumption, but without proof, no one can really assign blame anywhere. The murderer remains faceless.)
JerulEon (NA)
: I would have to disagree with your reason about why Yasuo felt guilty that Taliyah trusted him. It's true that he took the guard post because of Yone, but Yasuo followed his older brother's guidance because he needed to. Yasuo forgot humility: "He was impetuous and boastful; he ignored our master's lessons and knew nothing of patience." - Yone What led to Yasuo's downfall was his arrogance, not his blind faith. He abandoned his post to fight the Noxians and that allowed for the death of the elder and his eventual brother's death. Had Yasuo stayed at his post and listened to Yone's plea to learn "virtue required of a true swordsman", he could have protected the elder and not have had to kill his own kin. So when Yasuo heard Taliyah trust him, he felt guilty. Yasuo knew he failed Yone, his role model, and saw Taliyah was a better listener to him than he was to Yone. Other than that, I really like the parallels you drew between Yasuo and Riven, and I hope lore is more like this in the future. +1
I would argue that while yes, his arrogance is what ultimately damned him, it was present both before and after his choice to take the guard post. If he had held on to his arrogance, as opposed to listening to Yone and trying to humble himself, then he wouldn't have been in the position to fail the Elder at all. He would have been far away, and accounted for by some other aspect of the Ionian military. It was the choice he made to follow Yone's guidance, rather than choose his own path, which led to the opportunity for his pride to make him fall. Alternatively, if Yasuo had understood that he was guarding the Elder because it was something virtuous and necessary, then his pride wouldn't have been a factor. He would have been doing something worthy of his skill, whether or not that involved slaying Noxians. Without an understanding of that aspect of the post, his "why" of taking the post in the first place had more to do with his admiration of his brother than it did his acceptance of his brother's lecture. He believed his brother knew best for him, so that was why he followed Yone's advice--Not because humility was something he wanted for himself. Taliyah has been given no reason to trust Yasuo, besides the fact that he teaches her. That's really all they've done, up to that point in the story. >"In truth she had not asked anything of him except to be taught." Their relationship is built entirely on how he teaches her. She respects him because of what he gives her, and trusts him because he embodies the restraint she's trying to learn, not because she listens more closely to him than he had to his brother. --- Interesting enough, it is only after he has been accused of the murder that he becomes as reserved as the teachers attempt to make him, and as we see in this piece of his life. Similarly, his well-known penchant for alcohol could be seen as a way for him to embrace the wilder side of his personality without actually acknowledging it, as I doubt a school of swordsmen who teach such powerful techniques would advocate the use of something that alters the mind the way alcohol can. But that's a separate claim, and one that has less evidence to back it up. Just an interesting perspective, I think.
Rioter Comments
Vrashk (NA)
: Execution Day -- A Fan Story
Fun fact, this was written in two hours, listening only to a loop of Draven's login theme.
Rioter Comments
Rioter Comments
: Just because your support can heal you...
As an adc main that fills a _lot_, guys: if you have a heal support, _for the love of anything holy, **trade**._ If you don't trade you've commit to a passive lane. If you trade, you win pretty much _every trade_ because you have a support capable of repairing the damage done to you, giving you health advantage. This doesn't mean walk out of the minion wave into convenient position to face-tank a {{champion:412}} hook. This means trade auto attacks, minor abilities, while staying safe from all-in potential. Most heal supports double as poke supports: if you get hit by an all-in ability, you in deep trouble. So while you still have all your summoners, and your support has mana, _trade like they have a shiny pokemon and you're the only one that knows what it is._ Get that lane under lockdown through sheer grit and determination, make them fear your aas and full health bar.
: ADC build paths
I would like to make a case for BotRK on Varus as a situational item based on whether the enemy team has anyone that would scale up to a certain level of health, or if you just go back with 1400 gold. Considering the way Blighted Quiver stacks, and how much of his damage it is, if you don't need to poke the enemy laners out with Q, it's quite the option.
: Decesions Decesions.... Help Plz...
Okay, so here's the basic information on both when fed: {{champion:111}} : He excels at locking down a target, and with the long duration on his shield, so long as the enemy carries aren't fed all to hell, you can soak a large amount of damage with the shield itself. His ability to guarantee a knockup on a specific target is also fight-breaking. He won't do any special kind of damage, on the other hand. He really just doesn't have damage skills, but he makes up for that with a stupid amount of cc. {{champion:119}} : Draven puts out damage. Draven puts out a stupid amount of damage. Draven puts out damage so quickly and so stupidly high that he can oneshot squishies if sufficiently ahead, and I know of no adc save a Quinn with the drop on him that could actually duel him, purely because of his ridiculous damage. He doesn't fall off lategame, and in fact scales into lategame better than most adcs. What falls off lategame is his utility: he has a slow/knock-side, and that's it. He doesn't even have a passive after hitting full-build, because extra gold does nothing if you don't buy anything with it. That's why people think he falls off: passive becomes useless. Despite having no passive, he still does very well late game. Tradeoffs of each champion {{champion:111}} : He has a weak early clear and his ganks are far from guaranteed. Nautilus excels in situations where he can countergank, entering a situation with the ability to peel someone off his team with an easily hit anchor. However, if you miss the anchor, that's a lot of his "free kill" pressure gone, because he has no gap closers. If you want to gank as Nautilus, it's best to wait for the enemy to burn any sort of dodge ability first, then anchor. This usually means just walking into lane behind them and getting up close to snare with his passive. {{champion:119}} : Draven is so mechanically difficult to play that a bad Draven is totally ignored after dying once. Nobody has to care about him because he isn't a threat. All of Draven's power comes from his Spinning Axes, and if he drops those, then he loses a massive chunk of his strength as an ADC. In teamfights, the mark that shows where the axes land makes it easy to toss cc where Draven HAS to be, forcing him to either take cc (which is terrible, as an adc) or lose damage (which is terrible, for Draven.) He needs a high level of mechanical skill to function against a decent team, but he'll steamroll anyone that can't deal with him.
darkdill (NA)
: So the new Champion is a Bard...
Guys. Guys. Guys. If it was *a* bard, the teaser would have called the constellation *The Bard.* Bard is its name. Not its profession. "The Mountain Shrines," "The Great Protector," if the constellation referenced a bard, why would Riot include that other civilizations don't associate it with things that would be typical of bards? Sounds more like a protective spirit kinda creature, to me. And besides. That constellation looks eerily mask-like.
Shetler (NA)
: What's your biggest Noob Moment?
My worst moment was on Varus, and it was recent. It was within the last week. It was, in fact, yesterday. I apologize in advance for the text wall, but I am a storyteller first and foremost. I began playing League of Legends right after Varus was released, almost three years ago. His was the login screen I saw first, his was the login music that stuck in my head as I started up my first game with two friends, immediately jumping into 3v3s. I didn't play him then, I played Master Yi instead. The old Master Yi. I got my first taste of the Reset Zone then, but I digress. Over the levels, I eventually bought Varus. I played around with him some then, and more after getting to level 30. Following a string of games where my support dc'd immediately upon entering the game, Varus taught me how to 1v2. I learned the pattern for csing under turret with him. I played Varus as my primary adc for the longest time. And then I dropped him. For almost two years, I didn't play Varus. Mid lane had ensnared my focus, and I stuck to that for a year. After getting some tips on Draven build from a friend I returned to bot lane and became a Draven main. Bot had called to me and I came running. I am now an adc main. Bot lane is my home, and Draven is my loving wife. I have no regrets, and my csing has surged due to that dedication. When I saw that Varus was getting his Arctic Ops skin, I rejoiced. He finally had a good skin! I played the skin for two games and went back to Draven. It wasn't that Varus lacked anything for me, I was just more comfortable with spinning axes than Blight stacks, by that point. A few days ago I played a normal game with Varus, because I was talking to my friend when I was in lobby, and decided that I hadn't played that adc in a while, I should see if I still remember how to Varus. Turns out that, as rusty as I was, I still knew how to Varus. And I Varus'd hard. I talked to my duo lane partner, since he knows matchups better than I do. Turns out Varus is pretty good against heavy trading adcs, like Miss Fortune, Caitlyn, and Draven. Knowing this, I made the executive decision to dust off the bow, clean off the rust, and add Varus back to my champion pool. So I hopped into normals with my duo partner. Yes, it's not a nice thing to do. No, I don't regret it. It was totally fair. Stop looking at me like that. I played nine Varus games yesterday, but we'll focus on the third. Allow me to set the scene. Laning phase has come and gone, and we're rapidly approaching late game. The enemy Jinx was fed two early kills, both on my duo partner playing Braum. (He had an unfortunate game.) From there she had snowballed a little. My cs was keeping me relevant, and I could pick off kills in teamfights, so I wasn't *too* far behind her. The enemy Mordekaiser was snowballing out of control, however. Both our inner and outer bot turrets were down, as were top turrets. Our mid inner still stood. The enemy Jinx, Leona, and Lee Sin were sieging up mid inner turret. Enemy Malzahar was pushing the wave to our Inhibitor turret in bottom lane. The enemy Mordekaiser was nowhere to be seen. Braum and I were just leaving base, and the other three on my team were desperately trying to save mid inner turret in a 3v3. The support of a Braum and Varus would tip the balance in our favor, there. Otherwise it would be a fragile peace that neither side was likely to win. I heard static crackle over the Skype call as my support made my decision for me. "Yo, let's kill that Malz. He's overextended and team can hold." Malzahar beat a hasty retreat at the first sign of Braum's imposing visage, but the passive had already been procced, and it's quite hard to run when you're covered in ice and stunned. Malz went down without much of a fight. During the ten seconds it took to kill the rogue magus, Mordekaiser had arrived mid lane like a pillaging viking. He looted our turret, ravaged our team, and disappeared back into the fog of war 600 gold the richer, with our Xerath escaping back into the safety of our base. Jinx went to work on our turrets, and our inhibitor was exposed before we made it back to bottom inhibitor turret. Waiting for us were the enemy Lee Sin and Leona. They saw what we did to their friend Malzy, and they wanted revenge. Or to keep us from doing something to stop them, I never did figure it out. Leona was pretty low when she showed up, so two auto attacks and a Q to detonate my stacks of Blight dropped her, leaving Braum and I to deal with Lee Sin. Lee Sin, the champion with two dashes gated merely by energy. Known for his strategy of dashing, dashing, *flashing*, and then kicking you back into his team, Lee Sin has mobility in spades. For those of you that don't know, Varus is not a very mobile champion. With low movespeed and no mobility abilities, his worst enemy is strong gap closers. He is, however, well equipped to limit the enemy's mobility. With Lee Sin snared and then stunned by Braum's passive for almost 4 seconds safely out of melee range, he went down as well. The enemy team was in rout, and I wasn't in a great position health-wise to continue pressing them. I pressed b, ready for homeguard to kick in as I spent some gold. While Braum and I were dealing with Lee Sin, the fed Jinx had dived our Xerath. That went about as well as you would expect, with her running out of nexus turret range on five hundred health. I don't know what strange humors possessed her to run at the angle she did, but she appeared on my screen in a blur of blue, and vanished under my Q animation. I chuckled and started my b again, now with enough gold for a late Bloodthirster. Our inhibitor open and ripe for the plucking, Fed Mordekaiser rose from the depths of whatever hell spawned him and entered our base. I could hear the tension on the other end of the Skype call as my duo partner, again, decided what I was doing. "Come on, go for the Morde. I'll exhaust him. Ready?" I grunted my assent and we approached. The exhaust went out, I used Mercurial Scimitar to stop the ult, and I died anyway. *"Fuck!"* came the cry from across Skype. I snorted and picked up my Bloodthirster, already pinging Baron for the rest of my team as I watched a 60 second death timer tick down. I happen to glance at chat. "wowoow, scumbag morde" from our Cho'Gath. *Not really,* I think. *Killing me is kinda his job. No big deal, I guess he was a bit of an ass about it, doing it through exhaust of course.* I rez and start on my way to Baron. Check the map, check the chat (seems like an all chat argument was happening, I noted), joke with my duo partner a bit. Mordekaiser [29:30]: pentakills are earned, not granted. I was confused, to say the least. Yeah, he was fed, but I could have sworn he didn't get a penta. And besides, he wouldn't be saying that if *he* had missed it. I blink a few times. Confused, I ask over my support, "Wait. Did I get a quadra?" "Yeah, why did you think I wanted Morde so bad?" "I...I don't know. He was hitting the inhib, we're already behind, it's kinda hard to come back from that...I got a quadra?" Guys, I got a quadra when I didn't even register getting a *double kill.*
: SUpport Questions and Wave control during Laning phase
A few more instances when pushing assistance is helpful is when the enemy support is being incredibly passive. If you're allowed to do whatever you want with your positioning, and you have good wards in the enemy jungle, try forcing the lane to their turret. Unless their support is helping prep the minions, adcs will likely miss more cs under turret than otherwise. Also, if you're ahead in lane already and could feasibly win a 2v3, or your jungler wants to set up a situation where they could counter gank.
Mellori (NA)
: This helped a bunch, so thank you. :D I'm just replying to this post because it's the last one. xD I already have started ranked a while back, but all I felt comfortable doing was playing support. Not that it's called often, but when it is, I'm left floundering and knowing I can't do any of the other roles too well based on my trials and errors in the past. So I figured with the new season coming up I'd learn some other roles and start out with some tips instead of going in blind. As far as what champions I've been looking at: Top Lane: Gnar, Shyvana. Mid Lane: Ahri, Nidalee, Orianna, Syndra, Elise (I've been told she's best here if she doesn't jungle, dunno). I'd obviously have more mid-lane favorites since most of my champs are mages, y'know. ADC: I kinda like all of the ones I have. Tristana and Teemo I'd never take ADC, though. Just feels weird. Add me if you want to. I could always use the extra tips, or someone to practice with/against if you're willing.
No problem, I'm happy to help! Now for some champion specific tips. This should be quite a bit shorter, at least that's the plan. **Gnar** Gnar is an excellent top laner, one of my favorites right now as well. A lot of his power comes from the threat of detonating his third w stack, which makes him quite powerful for top lane since many top laners build health. (That said, don't let me convince you to max W first. Always Q.) Some things to watch out for with Gnar is hitting the minion wave a bit too much with his boomerang can force you to push when you don't mean to. It can also help you push faster, which is helpful if your lane opponent just went back to base. The more of your minions that die to their tower, the harder you just made the lane for them. It's especially easy to push very, very quickly as mega Gnar, considering his AoE burst damage. As a champion, Gnar is quite a good place to start if you want to learn when to engage on your enemy for a kill and when not to. Mega Gnar can pull some unexpected damage out of nowhere, so it can help you get into the mindset of "How much damage will they do to me if I pull off my full combo right now? Will I kill them fast or does the Darius have time to stack his bleed? If I engage right now, will I stop being cute and fluffy in time to not die and kill them?" **Shyvanna** The Half-Dragon is an odd champion, because while most of her damage comes from auto attacks, most of her ability to lane is tied up in her W, Burnout. It's an amazing tool for harass and kiting, and a lot of her ability to win lane comes from knowing when to straight up auto attack the enemy laner and when to let Burnout's magic damage tick on them through the wave. Again, I have to mention that her W can and will push waves harder than anticipated if you don't pay attention to where you stand in the wave. **Ahri** Not someone I have too very much experience with, but here goes. As always, I will warn you that Ahri has the potential to push very hard, very fast. With her Q doing quite a lot of damage to the wave, she's capable of shoving to turret just by poking against most mid laners, and especially against anyone without strong AoE clear. That said, Ahri also has the tools necessary to survive being pushed like that, with both hard cc and a lot of mobility after level 6. If you see another lane is pushing towards your team's turrets, it's a fine idea to push your lane to the enemy turret and roam, hopefully setting up a gank for one of your teammates. A well-executed Ahri gank is a terrifying thing to behold. I'm going to skip Nidalee because I have *no* experience there. Land your spears as often as you can. **Orianna** Another with very nice wave clear due to the AoE nature of her kit, Orianna has both the auto attack damage and the low-cooldown, low-mana damage from her q to help her with last hitting cs. She's a bit more dangerous to push past the center of the lane with, (And her AoE will definitely push if you aren't careful) but that's because she doesn't have a dash. Her damage and slows, when intelligently applied, can still do wonders for her survival. When positioning the ball in lane, try to think about where your opponent has to go to either poke you or last hit. You'll quickly notice that the better laners will establish a small safe zone around the ball and never willingly get closer to it. Use this to your advantage to zone them off the wave, and if they disrespect the ball, a quick Q W should fix that. Syndra is similar to Orianna, save that you have a knockback/stun to help secure kills and deter ganks. Her Q does wonders for poke and wave clear, but the tips I can give are not fundamentally different from those for Orianna. I also don't know Elise very well, I haven't played her recently and I don't see her played often either, apologies. She can be very fun to play, though. Her explosive spiderling will jump on your target if you use the spider-form Q, since it is, in fact, a spiderling. ADCs are a lot more complicated to give tips on, so here's the rapid-fire version. Jinx: Know your range for your rockets, but use them only for the AoE damage and extra range. Your minigun is your base state, rockets are for when you need extra range in a fight or for poke. This will save you a lot of mana, and might net you some extra kills. During teamfights, use your ult either to save your own life or to hit multiple targets after the fight has been going on for a little while. The same goes with your flame chompers. Securing the kill on a fleeing enemy is less important than convincingly winning the team fight, and you will do overall more damage hitting multiple targets. Kalista: Your Rend is your friend in both cs-ing and fighting. Your support is also your friend, but that's because they contribute to your damage through W. Try to proc the W mark if they poke, but be careful of overextending. Just because you jump after every auto attack doesn't mean you're impossible to hit with skill shots. Also, use your Sentinels regularly. They have a long cooldown and it's rare there will be a "perfect" opportunity to use them, so if you feel like tossing one in the jungle for safer laning, go for it. Miss Fortune: Build Blade of the Ruined King first. A lot of Miss fortune's damage comes from her auto attacks, even though hitting those high-damage Qs feels *so good.* I promise you that if it's a Miss Fortune with Blade of the Ruined King verses a Miss Fortune with Infinity Edge, unless there is an absurd number of crits going out, the BotRK Miss Fortune will win. Learn how to use her Q to hit the enemy laner with the bounce, because it does so much more damage. Sivir: She *needs* a hard-engage support like Leona or Thresh to perform the best she can, because her early game damage is phenomenal, but she doesn't scale well into late game. So she has to convincingly win early game and make sure the enemy ADC doesn't farm their way back to relevance. Her Spell-Shield is one of the most fun abilities in the game when you start shielding point-blank abilities. Teemo isn't really an ADC, he is Satan in disguise. He also doesn't scale as well with AD as he does with AP. So there's that. Tristana: She is going to push the lane. Don't fight it, don't try to stop it, it's just going to happen. Her explosive shot is amazing for wave clear, but because it can't be turned off, you will be at the enemy turret before you know it. Her jump ignores CC for the first half second of the animation, so if you're expecting CC to stop you from escaping, just use the jump. You might still be CC'd after landing, but you're likely a lot farther away from danger than you were before. Varus: Another I would recommend building Blade of the Ruined King on. Attack speed is so very important for him to get early, as a lot of his dueling potential comes from detonating his stacks of W with an ability. Sniping people with a full Q is all well and good, but during a fight you do lose damage if you fully charge your Q. As an ADC, auto attacks are your friends. Vayne: The cleanest ADC mechanics in the game, playing a good Vayne feels legendary, and playing a bad one feels like you're impotent. Vayne's positioning is more important than a lot of other things, as she wants to get off as many autos as possible. Use your ult freely, if you think you'll be fighting more than three seconds then pop it. The stealth is amazing for faking people out as well. If you see another Vayne and want to gauge how good they are, watch how often they Tumble in a fight. The more they tumble, the better they are. It sounds arbitrary but its surprisingly true.
Vrashk (NA)
: I'll try to organize this as best I can around what you've asked for. That said, if you're a bit more specific about which champions you're looking at it would also be easier to give you examples. Also, this is going to be a long read. A very, very long read, as I tried to be comprehensive. If it's too much information please let me know, and I'll compose something a bit more palatable. And much, much shorter. Because yikes, this is kind of huge and somewhat technical. Big thing to know, you don't have to know everything on this page, I just tried to cover all my bases. I'm more than happy to add you in-game and give a spark notes version, too. **Great Map Awareness** Having good map awareness is huge, and if you already have that portion down then you're in for a decent laning experience at least. Knowing where the enemy jungler will likely be because of your teammates is immeasurably helpful, and can let you be a little more aggressive than you otherwise would be. **Ranged Mages** If you're already used to squishy mages, I'd recommend looking towards mid as a place to branch into first. Playing champions like Karma and Vel'Koz in bot lane is very similar to their mid laning tendencies, so taking champions you might have already practiced and using them in mid lane (In normals, of course) as a way to learn the dynamics of a new lane is an excellent idea if you're worried about laning. If you already know your champion then you aren't learning the intricacies of both a new champion and lane at the same time. **Skill-Shots** This is honestly similar to the above point. The better you are with skill shots, the better you will be in most mid lanes. And if you're really itching to practice mid lane skill shots on a new champion, play Xerath when he's free. That will be a trial by fire, and most of the time you will be safe in lane if you keep good wave control. (More on wave control later.) **CS** This gets into a little bit more tricky territory, but understand that you aren't alone. My roommate did almost the same thing you did while leveling, and he's quite good at support because of it. On the other hand, supports have to cs the least in a game, so they get the least practice. I'm constantly giving him a hard time for his cs in a game. It's the curse of a support main. That said, CS cannot be overstated. To put it bluntly, CS wins lanes more often than kills do. If you're looking to practice your last hitting, take someone with low ad, such as Nami, into a custom game and *only last hit*. Perfect cs for mid lane is right around 208, I believe. Go wild. I understand that isn't very helpful (nor very fun for most people). To honestly get better at csing, watch the minion wave. See which minions your wave is attacking, how much damage the enemy wave is taking, how much damage your auto attacks/abilities do to the wave, and predict when certain minions are going to get low enough to last hit. That is, without a doubt, the easiest way to secure creeps. Timing the auto to last hit can be a bit tricky and differs from champion to champion, but knowing the hp you need to last hit at is the first step to better cs. It takes practice, and once you get the knack for it, the only change is learning timing for different champions. With enough practice and understanding of how waves act, you can apply it to your supporting as well, prepping minion waves to make it easier for your adc to last hit. Side note: Please don't do that unless you know what your doing and your adc has demonstrated some form of competence. Some adcs aren't very appreciative of people "making their farm harder." When you know what you're doing it really is a huge benefit, I promise. My support is the reason I have high cs as an adc most games. **Pushing Too Far** At the risk of telling you things you already know, I'm going to start at the very basics and work up with wave control here, because it can be a complicated concept and making it harder to understand is so very easy. For ease of communication, the terminology I'm going to use is listed here. None of it is highly necessary for gameplay, it's just for ease of reference while I explain more: > *Wave Crash:* when a minion wave runs into a non-player controlled aspect of the game and engages in combat, such as the enemy minion wave or the enemy turret. * >Pushing:* the direction the wave is moving towards over time. If, after thirty seconds, the wave crash has progressed towards the enemy turret, your wave is pushing. If the enemy wave is gradually moving closer to your turret, they are pushing. * >Tanking the wave:* rather self-explanatory, it's when a champion takes damage from the minion wave for one purpose or another. * >Freezing the lane:* when the opposing minion waves lose health equally, so that the next minion wave will crash in the same place in the wave. So if the minions were fighting just out of your turret's range in a frozen lane, the minions of the next wave will continue fighting in the exact same part of the lane, just outside your turret's range. * >Resetting the lane:* when you cause the minion waves to crash in the dead center of the lane, the same way they did the very first time they spawned. I should write a dictionary, that was an unfortunate number of definitions. Now for the meat of the section. Starting at 1:52 in mid lane and 2:04 in both top and bot lane, minions will crash and begin fighting. From here, with no outside help, one of two things will happen. 1) Your minions will deal slightly more damage to the enemy wave than the enemy wave deals to yours. In this situation, your wave will clear out the enemy's and begin pushing towards their turret. 2)Enemy minions will deal slightly more damage to your wave than yours deals to theirs. In this situation, their wave will clear out yours and begin pushing towards your turret. One of these two things will happen eventually, if not immediately. This happens because when two minions focus on the same target they will wear that one down faster than that one will wear down its target. The basics of wave control is understanding how damage from sources outside the wave affects the direction the wave will push. Say, for instance, a Nami bubble hits the enemy ranged minions. They take about 70 damage and don't attack your minions for a few seconds. That small action means that, slowly, your wave will push towards their turret. The damage difference is small so it will take a while, but the extra auto attacks and abilities that hit the minion wave during laning can contribute to pushing over the course of a lane. The easiest way is to think of it as a scale. When the damage on one side is greater than the damage on the other, the side with greater damage will push harder. This is why, when you are auto attacking the wave and your opponent isn't able to reach the wave, you slowly push to their turret. Your autos contribute more damage to your side of the scale than the enemy wave can counteract. This is where last hitting affects wave control. When you last hit you are minimizing your impact on the wave. Properly done, last hitting will very, very slowly push the wave, because you are still contributing damage to the scale. However, if your opponent is doing more than last hitting, say they auto the wave or use an ability, the wave will slowly push towards you. Keeping track of the scale all the time isn't very easy or practical below maybe Diamond rank. It's best to just reevaluate which direction the wave will go every so often based on how many minions are on each side and how aggressive the enemy laner is in last hitting. If the wave hits either turret, then it will be reset. The turret does an enormous amount of damage to the wave, and it's difficult to counteract that without causing a total reset yourself. A good rule of thumb is that hitting the enemy turret will cause the lane to push back towards your turret somewhat, and then the balance of damage resets. Tanking a wave prevents the wave from hitting the turret, and is a sort of "artificial" freeze to the lane. You simply stand in front of an enemy wave of minions that would otherwise walk toward your turret and take the damage from the minions until your wave reaches the lane. This will keep the wave stuck in one position, and the closer that position is to your turret, the safer you are from engages. When you've pushed the lane too far, you have a few options. 1) You can push the wave to the turret and cause the it to reset partially. This isn't a fool-proof plan, as the chances are good that your next few waves will steadily push toward their turret as well, leaving you in a cycle of push, reset, push, reset. 1a) If you know where the enemy jungler is and you're confident that you can take the enemy laner if they engage on you, or at least you believe you're able to escape if they do, this is a good decision. It's tough for a lot of people to properly last hit under a tower, so you deny them gold by forcing them to compete with tower. This is also a good time to get in some harass, dropping the enemy laner's health down to something a little less safe for them. 2) You can back off, go back to base, purchase items and heal up. This gives you item advantage and causes you to lose less overall experience and gold, but also lets the enemy laner gain some control over the wave and allows them to farm uncontested for a little while. If you have enough gold for a major item and don't think you'll be able to press your lane advantage any time soon, or if you think you're going to be ganked soon, this is a good option. If your jungler isn't clearing the jungle very quickly then you might also be able to steal one or two of his camps close to your lane for the extra xp/gold. Cont.
Cont. 3) Ward the likely gank path and keep pushing. This is a more aggressive version of 1, and it's mostly viable when you have control over your lane. If the enemy laner is scared of you or you're waiting for them to make a mistake so you can kill them, this is a good idea. Be very careful though, as this is when you're most susceptible to ganks. Oh, if you do take your junglers camps during laning phase, just uh...don't ever mention my name. It's regarded as a pretty rude thing to do right now in the very early game, and I'd rather not have angry junglers swarming me when I'm trying to adc. Thanks. **Melee Champs** Admittedly, these do tend to have a similar problem to what you're talking about. For some melee champions it's quite difficult to get out of a fight without just walking out and hoping the enemy laner stops chasing. This is why it's so important to gauge how much damage you can do and take as a melee champion, moreso than most ranged champions. Understand your champion, how to properly engage and disengage vs. the likely champions you'll see in each lane, and practice. Sometimes walking out is the only option, but if it works, then it works. In regards to champions like Katarina, it's best to treat them as ranged champions who have to get in close to finish their burst. Execute your damage as fast as possible and leave before the enemy retaliates. So, again using Kat as an example, Q the laner, Shunpo in, W to detonate the mark from your Q, and then use the movement speed from your W to get to a safe distance. **Laning Alone** This is a bit more of an acquired feel than some of the other points I've mentioned. Depending on how far up in the lane you are, you might *not* be able to escape. Proper wave control can help that, as can proper usage of Flash. But, depending on how far into the lane you are and who you're up against, there are situations where you must accept that you wouldn't be able to escape cleanly. This is, again, when you have to know how much damage you can put out and how much you can take. You have to judge for yourself in each instance if its worth the risk of a gank to get that extra poke and maybe a kill on your lane opponent. And, of course, light the surrounding area up like a christmas tree. The more information you have on the enemy team (Their jungler especially) the more confidently you can make decisions about how far to push your wave. Each specific lane does require practice just as much as champions themselves do, because each one has a different kind of playstyle to them. So umm, I think I exhausted everything I planned on mentioning, and more besides. I didn't expect this to take more than one post. Wow. Uhh...yeah. If you were looking for some more champion-specific tips then mention those, but I don't think I should make this much longer without being asked, because...damn. That was a lot of information. Probably too much, tbh... Oh right, I didn't say much about role-specific tips, so if you would like that kind of information let me know. I know adc best, but I can give some decent tips for most champions. So good luck! Practice solves many problems! Once you have a good grasp on one or two other lanes then don't be afraid of starting ranked, it's really not something to stress too much about. You can always rank up during the season!
Mellori (NA)
: Help With Expanding Roles
I'll try to organize this as best I can around what you've asked for. That said, if you're a bit more specific about which champions you're looking at it would also be easier to give you examples. Also, this is going to be a long read. A very, very long read, as I tried to be comprehensive. If it's too much information please let me know, and I'll compose something a bit more palatable. And much, much shorter. Because yikes, this is kind of huge and somewhat technical. Big thing to know, you don't have to know everything on this page, I just tried to cover all my bases. I'm more than happy to add you in-game and give a spark notes version, too. **Great Map Awareness** Having good map awareness is huge, and if you already have that portion down then you're in for a decent laning experience at least. Knowing where the enemy jungler will likely be because of your teammates is immeasurably helpful, and can let you be a little more aggressive than you otherwise would be. **Ranged Mages** If you're already used to squishy mages, I'd recommend looking towards mid as a place to branch into first. Playing champions like Karma and Vel'Koz in bot lane is very similar to their mid laning tendencies, so taking champions you might have already practiced and using them in mid lane (In normals, of course) as a way to learn the dynamics of a new lane is an excellent idea if you're worried about laning. If you already know your champion then you aren't learning the intricacies of both a new champion and lane at the same time. **Skill-Shots** This is honestly similar to the above point. The better you are with skill shots, the better you will be in most mid lanes. And if you're really itching to practice mid lane skill shots on a new champion, play Xerath when he's free. That will be a trial by fire, and most of the time you will be safe in lane if you keep good wave control. (More on wave control later.) **CS** This gets into a little bit more tricky territory, but understand that you aren't alone. My roommate did almost the same thing you did while leveling, and he's quite good at support because of it. On the other hand, supports have to cs the least in a game, so they get the least practice. I'm constantly giving him a hard time for his cs in a game. It's the curse of a support main. That said, CS cannot be overstated. To put it bluntly, CS wins lanes more often than kills do. If you're looking to practice your last hitting, take someone with low ad, such as Nami, into a custom game and *only last hit*. Perfect cs for mid lane is right around 208, I believe. Go wild. I understand that isn't very helpful (nor very fun for most people). To honestly get better at csing, watch the minion wave. See which minions your wave is attacking, how much damage the enemy wave is taking, how much damage your auto attacks/abilities do to the wave, and predict when certain minions are going to get low enough to last hit. That is, without a doubt, the easiest way to secure creeps. Timing the auto to last hit can be a bit tricky and differs from champion to champion, but knowing the hp you need to last hit at is the first step to better cs. It takes practice, and once you get the knack for it, the only change is learning timing for different champions. With enough practice and understanding of how waves act, you can apply it to your supporting as well, prepping minion waves to make it easier for your adc to last hit. Side note: Please don't do that unless you know what your doing and your adc has demonstrated some form of competence. Some adcs aren't very appreciative of people "making their farm harder." When you know what you're doing it really is a huge benefit, I promise. My support is the reason I have high cs as an adc most games. **Pushing Too Far** At the risk of telling you things you already know, I'm going to start at the very basics and work up with wave control here, because it can be a complicated concept and making it harder to understand is so very easy. For ease of communication, the terminology I'm going to use is listed here. None of it is highly necessary for gameplay, it's just for ease of reference while I explain more: > *Wave Crash:* when a minion wave runs into a non-player controlled aspect of the game and engages in combat, such as the enemy minion wave or the enemy turret. * >Pushing:* the direction the wave is moving towards over time. If, after thirty seconds, the wave crash has progressed towards the enemy turret, your wave is pushing. If the enemy wave is gradually moving closer to your turret, they are pushing. * >Tanking the wave:* rather self-explanatory, it's when a champion takes damage from the minion wave for one purpose or another. * >Freezing the lane:* when the opposing minion waves lose health equally, so that the next minion wave will crash in the same place in the wave. So if the minions were fighting just out of your turret's range in a frozen lane, the minions of the next wave will continue fighting in the exact same part of the lane, just outside your turret's range. * >Resetting the lane:* when you cause the minion waves to crash in the dead center of the lane, the same way they did the very first time they spawned. I should write a dictionary, that was an unfortunate number of definitions. Now for the meat of the section. Starting at 1:52 in mid lane and 2:04 in both top and bot lane, minions will crash and begin fighting. From here, with no outside help, one of two things will happen. 1) Your minions will deal slightly more damage to the enemy wave than the enemy wave deals to yours. In this situation, your wave will clear out the enemy's and begin pushing towards their turret. 2)Enemy minions will deal slightly more damage to your wave than yours deals to theirs. In this situation, their wave will clear out yours and begin pushing towards your turret. One of these two things will happen eventually, if not immediately. This happens because when two minions focus on the same target they will wear that one down faster than that one will wear down its target. The basics of wave control is understanding how damage from sources outside the wave affects the direction the wave will push. Say, for instance, a Nami bubble hits the enemy ranged minions. They take about 70 damage and don't attack your minions for a few seconds. That small action means that, slowly, your wave will push towards their turret. The damage difference is small so it will take a while, but the extra auto attacks and abilities that hit the minion wave during laning can contribute to pushing over the course of a lane. The easiest way is to think of it as a scale. When the damage on one side is greater than the damage on the other, the side with greater damage will push harder. This is why, when you are auto attacking the wave and your opponent isn't able to reach the wave, you slowly push to their turret. Your autos contribute more damage to your side of the scale than the enemy wave can counteract. This is where last hitting affects wave control. When you last hit you are minimizing your impact on the wave. Properly done, last hitting will very, very slowly push the wave, because you are still contributing damage to the scale. However, if your opponent is doing more than last hitting, say they auto the wave or use an ability, the wave will slowly push towards you. Keeping track of the scale all the time isn't very easy or practical below maybe Diamond rank. It's best to just reevaluate which direction the wave will go every so often based on how many minions are on each side and how aggressive the enemy laner is in last hitting. If the wave hits either turret, then it will be reset. The turret does an enormous amount of damage to the wave, and it's difficult to counteract that without causing a total reset yourself. A good rule of thumb is that hitting the enemy turret will cause the lane to push back towards your turret somewhat, and then the balance of damage resets. Tanking a wave prevents the wave from hitting the turret, and is a sort of "artificial" freeze to the lane. You simply stand in front of an enemy wave of minions that would otherwise walk toward your turret and take the damage from the minions until your wave reaches the lane. This will keep the wave stuck in one position, and the closer that position is to your turret, the safer you are from engages. When you've pushed the lane too far, you have a few options. 1) You can push the wave to the turret and cause the it to reset partially. This isn't a fool-proof plan, as the chances are good that your next few waves will steadily push toward their turret as well, leaving you in a cycle of push, reset, push, reset. 1a) If you know where the enemy jungler is and you're confident that you can take the enemy laner if they engage on you, or at least you believe you're able to escape if they do, this is a good decision. It's tough for a lot of people to properly last hit under a tower, so you deny them gold by forcing them to compete with tower. This is also a good time to get in some harass, dropping the enemy laner's health down to something a little less safe for them. 2) You can back off, go back to base, purchase items and heal up. This gives you item advantage and causes you to lose less overall experience and gold, but also lets the enemy laner gain some control over the wave and allows them to farm uncontested for a little while. If you have enough gold for a major item and don't think you'll be able to press your lane advantage any time soon, or if you think you're going to be ganked soon, this is a good option. If your jungler isn't clearing the jungle very quickly then you might also be able to steal one or two of his camps close to your lane for the extra xp/gold. Cont.

Vrashk

Level 87 (NA)
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